Teaching and Learning with JISC Digital Media

There is so much to think about and to learn about digital media on the JISC site linked below – and all in one place!
A framework called DiAL-e is described and the best part about this framework is that it:

encourages consideration of context, learners’ roles, content, learning outcomes, activity, feedback and re-usability – focusing on what the learner does with an artefact rather than giving priority to its subject or discipline content.

Eight core learning designs and six core learning spaces are described and then digital media to assist in transforming learning is placed into the equation.

As Australia looks at implementing a new national Curriculum, courses are being developed and programs rewritten it would be a great time for a rethink of how Digital Media can play an important role in encouraging the learner to use their ‘product’.

Evaluating Apps for Education

It’s that time of year – end of term evaluation is taking place; evaluation of the products of students’ work, of outcomes achieved, of teaching methodologies…
As we move into the use of technology in the classroom using Apps on hand held devices, how should we be evaluating Apps when we purchase them and before we use and recommend them? This rubric from a post by Tony Vincent on LearningHand is valuable.

Create an infographic – share ideas visually: Try easel.ly

Here is yet another way to present information. Students at Broughton have been learning to present information using Glogster, Prezi and Voki and here is yet another idea.
Easel.ly provides visual themes ready for data insertion. It is in early design stages so try this out – and give them feedback.

Technology forecasts – changes to teaching and learning

This chart, by the United States Department of Labor Futurework, graphically illustrates where we might be heading over the next thirty years based on the rapid changes in technology today. A conclusion is reached: “Fifty percent of today’s grade school kids will end up at jobs that haven’t been invented yet.” Clearly we must be training students to be creative and inventive.
This is where Guided Inquiry, used at Broughton in many classes, trains students to pose deep, personal questions, discover, select and channel information from many sources to reach conclusions that assist in bringing about change.

Web Literacy and Information Literacy

Students are often observed floundering in multiple website pages of useless information, or information that lacks authority.

At Broughton, Internet skills are taught specifically when I am assisting teachers in collaborative units of work – but more needs to be done across the board to enable all teachers and parents to guide students’ access to information and online activities safely, ethically and with authoritative results.

These two articles in eSchool News describe the dilemma – and what we as parents teachers and Teacher Librarians need to be doing.

Why more schools aren’t teaching web literacy—and how they can start by Alan November and Brian Mull

Web Literacy: Where the common Core meets common sense by Alan November and Brian Mull

Independent learners – it’s all in the ‘search’

Critical thinking skills are extremely important in order for students to be able to search and find relevant information to meet their research needs. This video clip  states that there is now a new digital divide – “those that are able to search and those that are not able to search.” Google provides online tools, webinars and lesson plans to help teach students search skills.

Many students go straight to the search box without noticing the many extra tools that help to narrow the search field down to relevant information.
AND…Don’t forget that our school library offers Teacher Librarian support and seminars to improve information and digital literacy.